IBM, I'm getting a Dell

When I was young, the laptops were Toshiba. Toshiba Satellite to be specific. Latter on IBM took that title with its Thinkpad, and the first laptop I bought was a Thinkpad which worked quite good. Very good, it’s been working almost non stop for four yeras already. I upgraded the hard disk and I gave it to my wife. I’ve decided to buy a new one. Continue reading “IBM, I'm getting a Dell”

Advertisements

Typing Esperanto in Ubuntu (or any other X)

I’ve got tired of not being able to easily type in Esperanto in Linux. There are some articles out there explaining it how and the are always convoluted and I’ve never seen one that gets to the point of typing “ŭ”, the always try very hard to get “ĝ”.

There’s an Esperanto layout in Ubuntu and I suppose other X Window Systems as well, but there are two things I don’t like about it. One is having to find out where the keys are, I could re-label them, but then I would only be able to type in Esperanto (which might be educational but not what I want, at least for now). I also don’t like the fact that it is Qwerty, not Dvorak. And even if it was Dvorak, one should make the statistics about Esperanto to make a proper Esperanto Dvorak-style keyboard. Continue reading “Typing Esperanto in Ubuntu (or any other X)”

Playing with Ruby

This is a remake of Installing Rails 2 on Ubuntu but targeting Ruby in general and with some improvements. Essentially the same, actually, but more usable, at least for myself.

Ubuntu, like many other free operating systems, have a beautiful package management system that will track what depends on what, what is installed, what is not, what is not longer needed, which versions of each. If you tamper with it, you are asking for trouble. If you do a manual upgrade, from sources, eventually a package upgrade will downgrade your version or some other application being incompatible will not work. And once you start throwing files in /usr, you start to ask for trouble. I’ve been using this type of operating systems for years and I’ve learned this by experience.

Continue reading “Playing with Ruby”

Installing Rails 2 on Ubuntu

Ubuntu, like many other free operating systems, have a beautiful package management system that will track what depends on what, what is installed, what is not, what is not longer needed, which versions of each. If you tamper with it, you are asking for trouble. If you do a manual upgrade, from sources, eventually a package upgrade will downgrade your version or some other application being incompatible will not work. And once you start throwing files in /usr, you start to ask for trouble. I’ve been using this type of operating systems for years and I’ve learned this by experience.

Nevertheless you, as I, want to try and code with Rails 2, right? Well, this is how I installed it in my Kubuntu box (should work the same for any Ubuntu and Debian derivate as well as others). I’ve decided to install everything on /opt/rails. I like to keep more-or-less self-contained directories in /opt. So I started with:

Continue reading “Installing Rails 2 on Ubuntu”

Encrypted home in Ubuntu 8.10

This article is like a third edition to “Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Debian…)”, although I keep changing the name. It’s the 8.10 edition. Many things changed and I updated the article for those, and the rest should work as well.

Motivation

Every day we put more and more personal information on our computers, and our computers become lighter, smaller, more mobile. In other words, the importance of the information gets higher and the possibility of being loosed or stolen gets higher as well.

Continue reading “Encrypted home in Ubuntu 8.10”

Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Xubuntu…)

This article is like a second edition to Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Debian…). Important changes include that I have tested it for Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn and it works, but the devices are sd instead of hd due to all hard disk being viewed as SCSI (I am not sure why). Also I corrected some text layout problems of the previous article and I am no longer targeting Debian. Since Debian 4.0 Etch encrypting the whole file system (but /boot) is trivial because it is supported on the install, so you are not likely going to need this. Also, it seems more and more Ubuntu is taking a different direction than Debian so we may start to find big differences and I am not going to test this on Debian. Continue reading “Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Xubuntu…)”

Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Debian…)

The explanations you’ll find here have been tested with Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft) and Kubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft), they should work without any problem in other members of the Ubuntu family and with minimal changes in other Debian-based distributions like Debian itself or Mepis. In other distributions it might require even more changes.
Continue reading “Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Debian…)”