Installing Rails 2 on Ubuntu

Ubuntu, like many other free operating systems, have a beautiful package management system that will track what depends on what, what is installed, what is not, what is not longer needed, which versions of each. If you tamper with it, you are asking for trouble. If you do a manual upgrade, from sources, eventually a package upgrade will downgrade your version or some other application being incompatible will not work. And once you start throwing files in /usr, you start to ask for trouble. I’ve been using this type of operating systems for years and I’ve learned this by experience.

Nevertheless you, as I, want to try and code with Rails 2, right? Well, this is how I installed it in my Kubuntu box (should work the same for any Ubuntu and Debian derivate as well as others). I’ve decided to install everything on /opt/rails. I like to keep more-or-less self-contained directories in /opt. So I started with:

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Encrypted home in Ubuntu 8.10

This article is like a third edition to “Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Debian…)”, although I keep changing the name. It’s the 8.10 edition. Many things changed and I updated the article for those, and the rest should work as well.

Motivation

Every day we put more and more personal information on our computers, and our computers become lighter, smaller, more mobile. In other words, the importance of the information gets higher and the possibility of being loosed or stolen gets higher as well.

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Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Xubuntu…)

This article is like a second edition to Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Debian…). Important changes include that I have tested it for Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn and it works, but the devices are sd instead of hd due to all hard disk being viewed as SCSI (I am not sure why). Also I corrected some text layout problems of the previous article and I am no longer targeting Debian. Since Debian 4.0 Etch encrypting the whole file system (but /boot) is trivial because it is supported on the install, so you are not likely going to need this. Also, it seems more and more Ubuntu is taking a different direction than Debian so we may start to find big differences and I am not going to test this on Debian. Continue reading “Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Xubuntu…)”

Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Debian…)

The explanations you’ll find here have been tested with Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft) and Kubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft), they should work without any problem in other members of the Ubuntu family and with minimal changes in other Debian-based distributions like Debian itself or Mepis. In other distributions it might require even more changes.
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The lambda revolution, Episode V, the deb strikes back

There’s an excellent article by Don “dons” Stewart called The lambda revolution which explains how to build a Haskell library in way that it is easy to download, compile, install, test, distribute, etc. I believe all those qualities are essential for successfully software. The next logicall step is to make OS-specific packages of it and since today I’ve had a short talk with Ian “Iglo” Lynagh, maintainer of many Haskell packages on Debian, who dissipated all my doubts about how to build a deb package of a Haskell library. Armed with that knowledge I am going to turn Don’s dlist into a beautiful deb package for Debian, Kubuntu or any other deb based operating system and tell you how.
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Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux (or Ubuntu), reprise

My little article Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux was published at Debian Administration where lot’s of people replied with other ways to achieve the same goals. It was very nice to see all the different approaches with all the different pros and cons.

In the end I ended up changing my own approach for one that is faster and cleaner so I wanted to share it with you. Still, go to the Debian Administration version of the article and read the comments, they are very cool (thanks to all those who posted!).

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Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux

You arrive at a Linux server which has some history of neglect. Let’s suppose someone else neglected it but if your new-year resolution is to stop neglecting your beloved server, this applies as well.

One form of neglect is to install, install, install and never un-install any package. The common utility to perform installation and un-installation of packages is apt-get which adds to the problem because it doesn’t have automatic removal of non-needed dependences.

PHP and ton of other packages. phpMyAdmin was removed when it was no longer needed but Apache, PHP and the ton of packages remain there.

Aptitude to the rescue. Aptitude is another package manager front-end like apt-get but it can keep track of automatically and non-automatically installed packages. That means that when you installed phpMyAdmin it was marked as non-auto while Apache and company was marked as auto. When you remove phpMyAdmin all the non-needed automatically installed packages like Apache would be removed.

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