Tag: ham

My ham radio licensing journey is now over: M0ONP

A friend of my dad introduced me to ham radio when I was 7 years old. When I was 15 or so I passed my beginner’s exam and then I did nothing with it. I got my call sign when I was 24 years old and moving out of Argentina: LU5ARC. I never used it because Argentina is not part of CEPT (and I haven’t gone back except for short holidays).

To get that Argentinean license, I had to take three months of two evenings a week of lessons on theory, Morse code and operating a radio (just making QSOs on 80 meters). I actually collected about 10 QSLs from that time (I wish I knew where they are).

When I moved to the UK almost 7 years ago, I looked into transferring my license but I was told it was impossible. I wish they also told me how easy it was to get a license in the UK and I wouldn’t have waited so long to get started. Last year something else got me interested in radio and I decided to take the plunge and get licensed. I was delighted to see how easy it is.

The hardest part of getting licensed was waiting for the two day course to happen (at that point, I didn’t know about ML&S running them). Because of my previous experience with radio and the fact that I studied electronics and electromechanics in school, there was little to nothing that I didn’t know for the foundation level. Without too much effort I got my first British call sign: M6UON.

Then, I had to wait again and I was thrilled to find that ML&S run foundation and intermediate courses, as well as advanced exams so often. I took the course, pass the exam, and I got my intermediate license: 2E0GGE. A month after that, I took the advanced exam and I now have my full license M0ONP.

Oh… even before there was a foundation course available, I went to the RSGB convention and I took the three exams in a row for the FCC (American) license, so, even before managing to get M6UON, I got an extra (full) one for the US as AC1DM. So ironic!

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And now the fun begins. I lifted all possible restrictions. I can use the full 100W of my Icom IC-7300 as well as take my Icom ID-51E PLUS2 abroad and use it. I can also supervise unlicensed people so I’ve been introducing all my friends to ham radio. I either have friends that are genuinely interested in this technical hobby that’s going without them knowing about or very good friends that humor me when I spend hours explaining frequency, modulation, SWR, antennas, bandwidth, etc.

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Book Review: General Class by Gordon West

I bought this book after watching a series of videos on YouTube that mentioned it:

61i+nE392VLThe book has a short introduction and then jumps straight into the question pool for the general class amateur radio exam. For each question, you have the four potential answers, followed by an explanation of the subject and the correct answer. Because the questions and the answer are so close, you might need to use a piece of paper to cover the answer while you think about the question without spoiling it.

I did my study mostly by watching the video and using https://hamstudy.org but the explanations on that website, sometimes, leave a lot to be desire. For quite a few questions, reading the explanations in this book helped a lot. It also has extra snippets of information spread throughout the book that are very nice.

Another positive thing about this book is that it’s full color. It has pictures but most importantly, diagrams and chart making use of the color range to make the information more accessible. Even though I know by heart some of that information, I find myself hopping they would make posters of these charts so I can hang them on my shack: they are beautiful and informative.

Oh… one more thing, I passed the test. Well, I passed the three tests in one sitting.

★★★☆☆

Buy 2015-2019 General Class in USA
Buy 2015-2019 General Class in UK
Buy 2015-2019 General Class in Canada