Printing emails in Django

When developing applications in Django, it may be nice to print emails instead of sending them. If you send them you have to be careful which addresses you use. Just being on the safe side and always using @example.{com,org,net} is not enough, you have to use an address you can actually retrieve emails for. And you have to configure your development environment to actually deliver mails. And then wait for the whole thing in each code-try iteration.

So, basing myself on the testing code, I’ve added this to settings.py and mails are now printed:

if DEBUG:
 from utils import BogusSMTPConnection
 from django.core import mail
 mail.SMTPConnection = BogusSMTPConnection

Of course you’ll also need the BogusSMTPConnection class, I’ve defined it as following:

from textwrap import wrap
class BogusSMTPConnection(object):
  """Instead of sending emails, print them to the console."""

  def __init__(*args, **kwargs):
    print("Initialized bogus SMTP connection")

  def open(self):
    print("Open bogus SMTP connection")

  def close(self):
    print("Close bogus SMTP connection")

  def send_messages(self, messages):
    print("Sending through bogus SMTP connection:")
    for message in messages:
      print("tFrom: %s" % message.from_email)
      print("tTo: %s" % ", ".join(message.to))
      print("tSubject: %s" % message.subject)
      print("t%s" % "nt".join(wrap(message.body)))
      print(messages)
      return len(messages)

And that’s it.

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Pylons or Django?

I am trying to decide whether to use Pylons or Django. Both are frameworks for building Python web applications, but with opposing philosophies.

Django tries to be everything. It comes with its own ORM, its own template engine, its own everything. That gives you a nice developing experience because everything fits together and because very nice applications can be built on top of all those components, like the admin tool, which is amazing. Continue reading “Pylons or Django?”

Django… awesome

I have an idea for a web application that might enjoy moderate success. And from time to time I try to develop it and it would be already done if it wasn’t that web developing is so painful (reading PLAI and trying to make my own Lisp to conquer the word is far more fun and entretaining… oh damn, I shouldn’t told you my plan… oh well).

My favourite framework so far is (and continues to be, more on that latter): UnCommon Web (UCW). But after reading an article titled Framework Performance (or Django vs. Rails vs. Symfony: Django is fastest on digg) I said: “Hey, let’s give this Django thing a try”.

Continue reading “Django… awesome”