Tag: biography

Book Review: Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson

leonardo-da-vinci-9781501139154_hrThis book was fascinating. I always thought of Leonardo Da Vinci as an artist who did other things aside from painting. This book changed my mind. Leonardo saw himself as a philosopher/scientist/engineer (those were sort of one and the same back then) who also paints; and after reading this book, I have to agree.

I think if it wasn’t for the fact that he didn’t publish his findings, he would be the father of modern science. His science/engineering was strongly empirical. He even disregarded religious explanations for things. I am in awe at many of his findings and discoveries. I’m also amaze at his acceptance of his sexuality, even when part of the world was claiming it was evil (to be fair, Florence in that time was sort-of like the liberal capital of the world).

I’m also glad he wasn’t a tortured soul. Yeah, he had his problems, but he seemed to have lived a long good life and that’s rare for people as exceptional as him. Another rare ocurence is that he seemed to have been appreciated in his time (not as much as later, but at least he was no Van Gohg).

I’m listening to the audio book and there’s a PDF companion that you can use to look at the paintings and drawings being described. I rarely find myself in a position to look at them as I listen to audio books while doing chores, driving, running, etc. Nevertheless the descriptions are good enough to appreciate the techniques but not the art obviously.

In the explanations of why Leonardo da Vinci’s paintings were so good I find myself in awe of the techniques he developed for his art. Specially if we consider that just perspective was something not understood very well long before his lifetime. I guess the renaissance was an important time for the development of art (I know, doh!). Something that annoys me is when the author makes subjective comparisons of the art as if they were objective (best painting, best technique, etc). Thankfully, this is not very common in the book.

★★★★☆

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Book Review: American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer by Kai Bird, Martin J. Sherwin

80571For this review I’m considering, without any fact checking or cross referencing, that this biography is factual and true to the events although clearly some of the statements in the book would be hard to evaluate as they describe the feelings of large groups of people.

I knew a bit about The Manhattan Project and it was fun to have another take on those years of science, innovation and destruction. What I didn’t know is what happened before and after in the life of Oppenheimer.

During the earlier years, I was surprised by how active Oppenheimer and other people were in the projects of the communist party. It sounds as during those days, for many Americans, it wasn’t the enemy’s ideology but a potential solution to their ongoing socioeconomic problems. Some glorified the Soviet Union before they knew and understood how tyrannical it was. I can’t begin to fathom at the absurdity of the witch hunt that was McCarthyism and what a negative force it excreted on the American scientific society. I can’t help but notice the parallel with the trial against Alan Turing.

What surprised me the most about what I read in this book was Oppenheimer’s transformation. You could never guess that the boy and young man described in the early chapters could ever become a leader of scientists, a pragmatic that could put a practical goal above the intrinsic curiosity that pushes people into science and achieve so much. I guess the fear of a Nazi world was a great motivator.

★★★★☆

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Book Review: Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of NIKE by Phil Knight

71KkAKYWcuLI always saw Nike as this faceless, soulless multinational corporation. I never thought it’s origin was not dissimilar to Apple’s: they were rebels. They fought tooth and nail against incredibly bad odds and prevailed. This book eradicated my dislike for this company.

★★★☆☆

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Book Review: Tap Dancing to Work: Warren Buffett on Practically Everything, 1966-2012 by Carol J. Loomis

tap-dancing-to-work-warren-buffett-on-practically-everything-original-imaearwszgsgegyjIt was OK. Because it’s a series of articles and not a real biography, there’s no cohesion. I think the biggest problem with this book is how boring the subject matter is.

Warren Buffet is obviously smart and a book trying to figure out how he does what he does could be interesting, but otherwise, from the outside, his life is quite boring (which I bet correlates with his happiness).

He didn’t seem to start dirt poor, just average. There was no drama. There was no losses to nothing and miraculous recovery. There was nothing more than a steady stream of rational decisions and a pile of money that grew to amazing proportions. Even then, Warren Buffet kept a supremely ordinary life, which makes me wonder why some rich people need so much protection and Warren Buffet doesn’t.

★★★☆☆

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