Tag: announcement

Typing Esperanto II

I’ve created deb packages with my patches to Esperanto layouts. To use them, in Ubuntu, for they are packages for Ubuntu, just follow the instructions for my PPA and upgrade.Then pick them in the configuration as usual.

Io syntax highlighting in Kate

After reading Io’s manual, I was really impressed. So I coded a Kate syntax highlighting for it. Of course it took me less than an hour (and I’ve had to relearn the syntax for Kate’s SH files). Here’s how it looks:

“Programming Languages: Application and Interpretation” now in paperback

Programming Languages: Application and Interpretation, the best book I’ve found on creating your own programming language is now available in paperback.

You can still get a free-of-cost copy of Programming Languages: Application and Interpretation at its original site. Actually, the book is now released under a Creative Common license, thank you Shriram!

This is, actually, old news. The book has been in paperback for quite a while, but I neglected to publish the post at that time. Today, a chat at the Esperanto meeting about Lulu (and how useful it is for Esperantists, that make books nobody wants to publish) reminded me about the post and I’m now publishing it.

Freeing Squeak, freeing Smalltalk

Squeak is by far the best and most complex Smalltalk implementation out there. It may not play well with other operating systems because it is an operating system by itself. It is also one of the most impressive development environments I ever seen. OK, the most impressive.

The only thing that bothers me is that Squeak is not really free software (search for Squeak in that page). Fortunately, some people are working on making it proper free software. Hurrah! I hope the succeed soon!

Score Reading Trainer 0.1.4 released

I have just made a new release of Score Reading Trainer, 0.1.4. This release has a very important bug fix, thanks to Julian Kniephoff. The fix allows to use notes below the first line of the staff without getting the extra lines mixed and eventually crashing. It was also upgraded to compile correctly and easily to a current KDE, version 3.

Joining the OpenID revolution

After watching the OpenID community grow for years, I finally joined them. I’ve liked the idea from the first day I’ve read about it; aren’t we all tired, after all, of having to remember hundreds of usernames, passwords (sometimes with conflicting constraints: a password must have numbers, a password can’t have numbers)?

From OpenID’s web site:

OpenID means the elimination of multiple user names and passwords and a smoother, more secure, online experience. For businesses, this means a lower cost of password or account management, the opportunity for easier and higher numbers of new user registrations and the elimination of missed transactions because of user frustration with lost and forgotten passwords. OpenID allows for innovation in the authentication space beyond just using a password to “unlock” your OpenID identity, but the ability to strongly protect your OpenID and have that benefit move with you everywhere you go online.

For me, joining the revolution was very easy. First I open an account on MyOpenID, then I installed the OpenID Delegate WordPress Plugin in my wordpress blog so my OpenID address is, actually, pupeno.com. So even thought I’m using a third party service, if they disappear I just pick another one (or become my own OpenID provider) and go on using the same address, pupeno.com. Isn’t it great? There are many other OpenID providers and many sites already supporting OpenID.