Suspending and activating trackings on Keep on Posting

You asked for it and you got it. If you go on a vacation or you temporarily stop posting in a blog, you can now suspend the tracking at Keep on Posting (without deleting it) and activate it whenever you want.

What’s the difference between suspending and deleting? There are two. First, you still have the tracking on the list, so re-enabling is just one click, and you don’t have to remember which blog it was, it’s just there.

The second is that while in suspended mode we keep all the data we gathered and we keep on gathering data, so when you hit activate, we can analyze that data for you without having to re-fetch it and any long term analysis we’ll implement will be possible (blogs only publish the last 10 posts over feeds but we keep track of previous posts when we can).

fofof was useless

It’s always hard to kill your own code, but not killing it when you have to is worst in the long run. My idea for fof and consequently my gem fofof was useless.

First I’ve discovered it didn’t work at all with the new Rails 3 query syntax. When I started to find a fix I’ve discovered I could replace the whole thing with:

 || raise(NotFound.new)

The examples in the Find or 404 post would end up like:

Blog.find_by_id(id) || raise(NotFound.new)

and

blog = Blog.fof.find(blog_id)
post = blog.posts.find_by_id(id) || raise(NotFound.new)

It’s less code, it’s more robust, I even think it’s much more readable. So there you, I’m killing fofof.

Sharing my code

I’ve recently wrote several posts that contiained code to copy and paste:

I don’t like copying and pasting code and since I was already doing it between several of my projects, I took those pieces of code and package them as gems. If you want, you can use them too:

I find it really awesome how many times some of my gems were downloaded:

Update: fofof is actually useless.

Overview of my new Extra 300S

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=13983943&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=1&color=ffffff&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

Some pictures of the building process and the finished result:

[flickr-gallery mode=”photoset” photoset=”72157624560393349″]

RadioControlPedia

I’m tired that there are no canonical URLs for most products, materials, systems, etc. regarding to radio control. The vendors do a very poor job of having an online presence. Some seem not to have a web site at all and the ones that do have very poor URLs, very poor data (old articles get removed) or very poor websites (frames, javascript, no way to deep-link).

Sometimes the best information is provided by the retailers, which is already wrong, but the real issue is that when retailers are not selling something anymore, they remove the product from the public page, and the information gets lost.

I’ve decided to fix the problem so I’ve created the RadioControlPedia. A wiki for RadioControl were articles will always stay and stay at the same URL. Over time it’ll have more and more information.

.gitignore

I’m launching a new site:

gitignore.com

For now it’s just a blog, but the final goal is different:

Every time I start a new project I hesitate to make the first commit: what should I commit and what shouldn’t I? Essentially, what should I put on .gitignore.

The goal of this site is to collet snippet of .gitignore that one should use depending on what framework, software, libraries, etc. are being used. I’ll try to put the ones I’ll know, but please, if you know any, send me an email to pupeno@pupeno.com and I’ll publish (with attribution).

My final goal is to develop a small web application with a list of the frameworks (as checkboxes or something) from which you can pick and it’ll build the .gitignore. But I’ll only do it if this site gathers enough information.