Book Review: General Class by Gordon West

I bought this book after watching a series of videos on YouTube that mentioned it:

61i+nE392VLThe book has a short introduction and then jumps straight into the question pool for the general class amateur radio exam. For each question, you have the four potential answers, followed by an explanation of the subject and the correct answer. Because the questions and the answer are so close, you might need to use a piece of paper to cover the answer while you think about the question without spoiling it.

I did my study mostly by watching the video and using https://hamstudy.org but the explanations on that website, sometimes, leave a lot to be desire. For quite a few questions, reading the explanations in this book helped a lot. It also has extra snippets of information spread throughout the book that are very nice.

Another positive thing about this book is that it’s full color. It has pictures but most importantly, diagrams and chart making use of the color range to make the information more accessible. Even though I know by heart some of that information, I find myself hopping they would make posters of these charts so I can hang them on my shack: they are beautiful and informative.

Oh… one more thing, I passed the test. Well, I passed the three tests in one sitting.

★★★☆☆

Buy 2015-2019 General Class in USA
Buy 2015-2019 General Class in UK
Buy 2015-2019 General Class in Canada

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Book Review: Amateur Radio Exam Secrets by Alan Betts

91lYFNMRVVLDisclaimer: I haven’t read it all, as I’m only going for the foundation level license so I only read the relevant sections and I’ll come back to it when I upgrade to other levels.

I bought this book without knowing anything about it and I’m so glad I did. The book covers all levels of amateur licences in the UK. The way it does it is that each chapter is divided in subsections for each of the levels, so, you can read each chapter up to level you are interested and move on to the next.

Each chapter contains a brief introduction to the subject followed by a set of sample questions like the ones you’d get in the exam. Unlike the American counterpart, the question pool in the UK is not public because you should learn the subject and not memorize answers. Having said that, having some mock tests really helps understand how well prepared you are. There’s even an extra set of questions towards the end.

The answers to all the questions are in an appendix almost at the very end of the book, so, it’s very convenient to avoid accidentally seeing the answer and losing the value of that question. I found thought that going back and forth was annoying and prone to seeing more answers than intended, so, I’d recommend for each section, to do all the questions by writing down the answers on a piece of paper and then checking them against the references.

At the very end of the book you also have the tables, band plan and references that you are allowed during the exam.

I highly recommend this book if you are going to take the exams.

★★★★☆

Buy Amateur Radio Exam Secrets in USA
Buy Amateur Radio Exam Secrets in UK
Buy Amateur Radio Exam Secrets in Canada

Trying to decide on a VHF/UHF radio

Next month, I’m taking my test to get a ham radio licence here in the UK. This is not my first licence. I’ve got LU5ARC years ago, as I was leaving Argentina, so, I never really got to use it. Years before that I’ve got a Yaesu FT411E, but I never transmitted with it due to lack of licence.

I don’t want that to happen again, so, as soon as I get my licence I want to hit the ground running and start using it. My plan right now is:

  1. Get a VHF/UHF hand held radio.
  2. Learn about antennas by reading:
  3. Get an antenna for VHF/UHF on my car (probably magnetic).
  4. Attempt to install a VHF/UHF vertical antenna in my house.
  5. Decide based on the information I have so far whether I can go for HF.
  6. Set up an HF base station.

Right now, I’m concerned about step 1. These are the things I’m after, in this order of preference:

  1. VHF
  2. UHF
  3. Ability to use a stationary vertical antenna
  4. Weather proofing
  5. D-Star (with GPS)
  6. APRS (with GPS)

I could try to get everything now, or maybe do it in stages. I’m not sure yet. I narrowed down my selection to these 5 radios:

  • Kenwood TH-D74
  • Icom ID-51 PLUS2
  • Icom IC-E91
  • Yaesu FT-60E
  • A Baofeng

Kenwood TH-D74

The ideal radio seems to exist and it’s the Kenwood TH-D74 (Buy: US). From what I’m seeing this piece of equipment is insane. It does everything and it does almost everything well (except maybe battery life). The price is also insane. If money was no object I would just get this radio and I’m done. I’d probably use it for many, many years.

Kenwood TH-D74

Icom ID-51 PLUS2

 

The runner up is the Icom ID-51 PLUS2 (Buy: US, UK). It’s more than 35% cheaper than the TH-D74 and it does everything but APRS. From this list it probably has the most bang for the buck since there are two ways of doing APRS: through D-Star repeaters that have it enabled or with an extra piece of kit that you plug to it. The audio quality seems not to be as good as the TH-D74 but it still is great. Like the TH-D74, this is a radio to buy, keep and don’t think about equipment for many years (at least not hand-helds).

Icom ID-51A PLUS2

After these two, we get into the get a radio now with the intention of upgrading later.

Icom IC-E91

Icom IC-E91The Icom IC-E91 cost less than half of the TH-D74 but I’m a bit puzzled by it. I cannot find a lot of reviews or information about it. It doesn’t seem to be a popular unit. It can do D-Star but to transmit GPS it requires an external GPS module that would put it close to the cost of an ID-51 PLUS2. When it comes to APRS, it’s the same story as for the other Icom on this list.

Yaesu FT-60

Yaesu FT-60The Yaesu FT-60 is a good solid radio. It cost about a sixth of the TH-D74 and it only ticks the VHF/UHF boxes on my requirements so this is definitely one to get started and upgrade later.

A Yaesu FT-411E was my first radio and I always had a soft spot for Yaesu, so it saddens me that they decided to make their own proprietary protocol for digital radio. This is why you don’t see any higher end Yaesu models, I don’t want to use nor support System Fusion. I really hope one day Yaesu will start producing equipment with D-Star, then I will consider again buying their higher end models.

A Baofeng

baofeng's messy product line in the uk

This would cost me the same as a pizza. It’s definitely in the buy something to get started and upgrade later. From a cost point of view, this is a no-brainier. I could just go ahead and buy one or two just for the lolz. I do have two issues with it:

The first is quality. Obviously I don’t expect high end quality, but I read some reports of horrible things. I don’t want to buy a paperweight.

The second issue is that I don’t know which one to get. Their line of products is a mess. In the UK they have a gazillion different models. They changed names three times (Pofang, Misuta). Their website is confusing and once I drill down on all the models, they seem to be all the same. If you look at their American presence, there they offer two radios with clear pros and cons, none of which are available in the UK.

Conclusion

Well, I don’t have one. I haven’t made a decision yet. I’d like to just buy a Baofeng now and upgrade later, but it sounds like I’m buying a problem. Getting the Yaesu seems a bit expensive for an upgrade-later path (but not too bad). Getting any of the high ends feel like throwing money for a toy instead of taking on a new hobby in a sensible manner.

Any word of advice?

Book Review: Getting Started In Amateur Radio by Steve Nichols

36282097I’m not an expert but I’m also not a beginner to ham radio (I’m LU5ARC in Argentina and I’ll be working on getting my UK license next month) and this book opened my eyes to a lot of new cool things to do in the world of amateur radio. I marked a lot of things here to explore once I get my license.

This book even has a section on antennas that give you a good idea of the sizes and types of arenas you could use for different bands.

On the negative, this book has quite a few grammatical errors and typos, which I don’t mind, but it also contains quite a bit of jargon that is never explained. A bit I knew already because of my limited experience with radio, a bit I had to look it up.

★★★★☆

Buy Getting Started In Amateur Radio in USA
Buy Getting Started In Amateur Radio in the UK
Buy Getting Started In Amateur Radio in Canada