I’m not available for hire

I just took a contract with Credit Suisse, so, I’m not available for hire at the moment, but of course, I’m always interested in hearing about really good opportunities. 

This page is a quick overview of what I have to offer and what I’m searching for. There’s an FAQ for recruiters towards the end.

I started coding in 1989 as a hobby and professionally in 1998 which gives me 18 years of coding experience of a very varied sets of technologies including but not limited to: Ruby, Rails, Clojure, ClojureScript, JavaScript, jQuery, ReactJS, EmberJS, Python, Django, Twisted, C, C++, Objective-C, Swift, Java, Erlang, Android (limited experience) , iOS (limited experience), Common Lisp, Scheme, Smalltalk, Haskell, HTML 5, CSS 3, mobile/responsive web, C#, Linux, BSDs, Puppet, DevOps, GlusterFS, PostgreSQL, MySQL, Solr, etc, etc.

Right now the technologies that I like the most and in which I can contribute the most are Ruby, Python and Clojure. I can do much more but I won’t be very good at Windows centric development.

For the past five years or so I’ve been working as CTO and CEO of small startups managing up to 7 people at the same time and taking care of everything from accounting to marketing to sales to business models, etc, etc. During these period I used some parts of the XP/Agile/Scrum methodologies to lead my team and as CTO I was the solution architect for many of my products.

For more details about my experience a developer skills, take a look at my curriculum vitae and coding portfolio.

At the moment I’d be interested in taking a permanent position if it’s a big jump forward in my career, otherwise I’m interest in contracting. Since this is my first time contracting, I don’t know what my day rate is and I’m working on figuring out its maximum.

Recruiter’s Frequently Asked Questions

When is the best time to call you?

I get more than 5 recruiters approaching me every day and many with very unsuitable job opportunities. If I jumped on the phone with each of them I would get nothing done.

Also, a lot of my work requires being on the zone. That takes between an hour to two to achieve. A phone call of as little as one minute can knock me over and I’ll have to start again from scratch wasting two hours or more. For example, if you knock me out of the zone at 15hs, there’s not a lot of value in trying to get back in as I’ll be going home by the time I’m productive. I protect this periods of high productivity fiercely but I can still do email and even chat while on the zone.

Will you take a job outside London?

Most likely not. I might if it’s a mostly remote work for a company in an interesting location, such as San Francisco or New York.

Will you take a junior role?

No.

Will you take a mid level role?

No.

Will you take this role that doesn’t pay top of the market but it’s interesting?

No, I’m sorry. My goal is to maximize my earnings.

Will you take a permanent senior developer position?

Maybe. This is not an advancement in my career, so the pay has to make it worth it and it’s competing with me being a contractor, which not only gives me higher pay, it allows me to be very tax efficient with my money.

Will you take this CTO / head of development permanent position?

Possibly. Those are in sync with my career, but again, only if the pay is good.

Can you still code? Can you be hands on?

Yes, I never stopped coding, even when I was CEO, and I’ll probably never will. As a manager, the only way to gain the respect of developers is to get your hands dirty with code, jump into problems with them.

Will you do PHP?

No, sorry. It’s a horrible language and a horrible platform. Using it is a mistake which I won’t be part of.

How many people can you manage?

My peak was managing 7 people and I wasn’t challenged at all in this regard. My guess is that I’d be fine up to 30 or so.

Why all this?

Please, please, I beg you to watch this video. Understanding this will make you a much better tech recruiter: