Category: Technical

Encrypted home in Ubuntu (or Kubuntu… or Debian…)

The explanations you’ll find here have been tested with Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft) and Kubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft), they should work without any problem in other members of the Ubuntu family and with minimal changes in other Debian-based distributions like Debian itself or Mepis. In other distributions it might require even more changes.
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From (broken) KMail to Evolution (or from maildir to mailbox)

If you are looking for a rant about how Evolution is better than KMail, look elsewhere. I am running Evolution because I am giving Gnome another chance and I like using all the standard tools to get an integrated desktop.
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Tramp

I have just learned about Tramp. An extension to Emacs that let’s you edit file remotely. Very nice. Kate can also do it through the fish KIO, but sometimes Emacs is such a good editor.

If you normally edit files on remote server and you like Emacs, check Tramp. I don’t have special attachment to any editor yet and I really can’t make full use of any of Vim or Emacs (the two editors I use most). I think I should sit down for a couple of weeks and learn Emacs.

SVGs in .Net using Cairo and Gtk+ (and C#)

If I was using C it would have been simply a couple of calls to librsvg, but on C# things got a bit more ugly because Rsvg, the wrapper around librsvg is not finished. And other bindings are also missing. Just getting a Cairo context out of a Gtk.DrawingArea was not as simple as I would have liked it to be (I describe how to do it in a previous post, but I’ll do it again here).

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Trying to find exceptions in Haskell

In my quest to re-learn Haskell I eventually thought: “OK, let’s see how an exception looks like”. Starting my favorite interactive Haskell implementation:

   ___         ___ _
  / _ \ /\  /\/ __(_)
 / /_\// /_/ / /  | |      GHC Interactive, version 6.4.1, for Haskell 98.
/ /_\\/ __  / /___| |      http://www.haskell.org/ghc/
\____/\/ /_/\____/|_|      Type :? for help.

Loading package base-1.0 ... linking ... done.
Prelude>

OK. Let’s generate an exception now, a division by zero for example (something basic): Continue reading “Trying to find exceptions in Haskell”

Django… awesome

I have an idea for a web application that might enjoy moderate success. And from time to time I try to develop it and it would be already done if it wasn’t that web developing is so painful (reading PLAI and trying to make my own Lisp to conquer the word is far more fun and entretaining… oh damn, I shouldn’t told you my plan… oh well).

My favourite framework so far is (and continues to be, more on that latter): UnCommon Web (UCW). But after reading an article titled Framework Performance (or Django vs. Rails vs. Symfony: Django is fastest on digg) I said: “Hey, let’s give this Django thing a try”.

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Unstable packages on Ubuntu

I’ve recently switched from Gentoo to Ubuntu. The main reasons is that in Ubuntu I have less things to take care about that I don’t really care about (like compiling Linux). In the switch I also lost some interesting features.
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The lambda revolution, Episode V, the deb strikes back

There’s an excellent article by Don “dons” Stewart called The lambda revolution which explains how to build a Haskell library in way that it is easy to download, compile, install, test, distribute, etc. I believe all those qualities are essential for successfully software. The next logicall step is to make OS-specific packages of it and since today I’ve had a short talk with Ian “Iglo” Lynagh, maintainer of many Haskell packages on Debian, who dissipated all my doubts about how to build a deb package of a Haskell library. Armed with that knowledge I am going to turn Don’s dlist into a beautiful deb package for Debian, Kubuntu or any other deb based operating system and tell you how.
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Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux (or Ubuntu), reprise

My little article Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux was published at Debian Administration where lot’s of people replied with other ways to achieve the same goals. It was very nice to see all the different approaches with all the different pros and cons.

In the end I ended up changing my own approach for one that is faster and cleaner so I wanted to share it with you. Still, go to the Debian Administration version of the article and read the comments, they are very cool (thanks to all those who posted!).

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