Going into the property business 

I’m a tech entrepreneur and that has not changed, but after six or seven years of trying to have at least moderate success, I’m starting to hedge my bets.

On the side, I want to have some passive income and it looks to me like buy and hold properties, that is, buying them and renting them out, also known as buy to let, is the way to move forward. I identified some very profitable areas and they are in the least expected places. For example, in London you can expect a return on investment of around 3% while I’m getting something around 16%.

If you want to listen to my journey, I’m documenting it as I go with Clayton Morris on his podcast about investing in property. He just published the second episode in which I talk about getting the money for my first two deals.  I just pulled the trigger on starting the business. I’m super excited and I can’t wait to share more good news in the next episode. 

Emacs is hurting Clojure 

Emacs is a very powerful text editor and its popularity amongst Clojurians is easily understood. Emacs has a long tradition in the Lisp communities as it’s written, in a big part, in a flavor of Lisp called Emacs Lisp.

Because of its history, it handles Lisp code wonderfully, with automatic correct indentation, paraedit, integration with REPLs, etc. But Emacs is really hard to use.

Yeah, most Clojurians know how to use it by now and they suffer from bias: “it’s not that hard” they say. Learning Emacs or Clojure is hard enough. Combining them is insane.

Many Clojurians also say it’s worth it. And again, I think they are biased. Human brains are very good at forgetting pain. Other editors these days are also very powerful and although not as much as Emacs, their usage is intuitive so you can achieve a higher level of proficiency just by using it, without spending time and effort in becoming better at it.

The way Emacs is hurting Clojure is by Clojurians maintaining this myth that you need to use Emacs for Clojure. This is not done by simple statements but by a general culture of jokes saying things such as “you are wrong if you don’t use emacs”.

Me, personally, I don’t care what editor you use. If you want to learn Emacs, go for it. Intellij and Cursive is much easier to use and almost as powerful. When I compare myself to another clojurian, productivity is generally decided by knowledge of the language and libraries, not the editor. If you want to use another editor, so be it. It’s better if they understand Lisp code but it’s not a deal breaker for learning Clojure.

I do care about the success and popularity of Clojure. Coupling the growth of the language to the use of an editor that is hard to use and non intuitive makes no sense. It’s hurting us. Even if you are an Emacs power user, when you talk to a Clojure newbie, please, don’t push it down their throats.

Thank you.

Avoiding threads of emails when developing a Rails application

Call to Buzz, like many applications I developed before, sends emails. Lot’s of emails. To avoid accidentally emailing a customer or random person I use mail_safe. It’s one of the first gems I install on a Rails project and you should too. mail_safe re-writes the to-header so you end up receiving all the emails that you sent.

Once you are receiving all these emails, there’s another problem. They are likely to have exactly the same subject, so, mail clients are likely to group them in threads, which can be annoying. To avoid that, I added this to my ApplicationMailer class and voila! all emails have a unique subject:

if Rails.env.development?
  after_action :uniq_subjects_in_development

  def uniq_subjects_in_development
    mail.subject += " #{SecureRandom.uuid}"
  end
end