My sneeze

Last friday I had my last drawing lesson. It was at the national gallery. The teacher showed us around, showed us good and bad paintings and made us draw some things. I never been to the national gallery before, so it was quite an experience.

I didn’t know that for this last lesson he was merging the drawing group, with the painting group. That’s when I learned I’m famous through my art. One of them said to me “So, you are the one that draw the sneeze?” Well… we all draw a sneeze because that’s what the teacher asked us, but I was the only one of two or maybe three, that didn’t go for abstract.

I generally don’t like abstract art, I don’t like producing it and I don’t like watching it. I decided to try to be symbolic about it and I draw this:

 

I’m not proud of the quality or technique of that drawing, but I’m proud of the idea. At least one person said he liked it during the lesson and a couple lessons later it was mentioned again and, as I said, in the last lesson people from other groups mentioned.

In my second attempt I tried to convey the release after the sneeze, but I didn’t like the result. Nevertheless here it is, the before and after of an explosive sneeze:

If I was running GitHub

If I was in charge of GitHub, I would build a team of .NET Programmers and have them built an awesome UI for Git on Windows, bundle it with Git itself as well as other usually needed programs like an SSH client and release it for free. Well, as open source of course.

The reason for that is that almost everybody that I know that’s using Git is also using GitHub and the number one objection I get to Git is Windows support. I myself chosen Mercurial once before just to be able to cooperate with my Windows-using friends. I think it’s time someone fixes that and I think GitHub has the most to win.

I know Git can be installed on Windows and that it works. But you need more than that. You need on amazing user experience and Git on Windows doesn’t provide it.

There are several reasons for that. Running Git in Windows is not as nice as Linux or Mac OS X, period. Even if the support was realyl good, the command line itself in Windows is not on par with Bash… even when you run Bash itself on Windows (which the last time I checked, you had to do to run Git).

Most important than that is that the Windows crowd are just used to UIs, so the most amazing command line tool won’t stand a chance against the crappiest UI. Windows users just search for another tool when no UI is provided. Even myself when using Windows do that. It’s another world with another dynamic and you have to play by their rules to win their game. And I have to admit, if I had to stop using MacOSX I would miss my favorite Git UI a lot, GitX (L).

J. Pablo Fernández

“J. Pablo Fernández” is not my name, my name is J. Pablo Fernández, but I see the former quite often. For example, as a donor for the L5 series:

That happens when someone takes the UTF-8 encoded version of my name and re-interprets it as Latin-1 or ASCII. Something that sadly happens very often. Programmers of the world, I know thinking about character sets and encodings make your brain hurt and that’s why you pick UTF-8 and forget about it. But otherwise, if you are handling data, you are using a character set and an encoding. You have to know and understand that. A great place to start is Joel Spolsky’s The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!).

Oh… the first episode of L5 was awesome, go and grab it. I can’t wait for the next one.